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Special Considerations


This article may contain information on medical procedures that are not recommended or endorsed by Catholic Health Partners. Promotion of this topic is prohibited by the Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Services. In the Ethical and Religious Directives, Catholic health institutions are prohibited from condoning contraceptive practices. Married couples should be given information about natural family planning as well as the church’s teachings on responsible parenthood. The information in this article is designed for educational purposes only. It is not provided as a professional service or as medical advice for specific patients.

Prostate brachytherapy - discharge

Alternate Names

Implant therapy - prostate cancer - discharge; Radioactive seed placement - discharge

When You Were in the Hospital

You had a procedure called brachytherapy to treat prostate cancer. Your treatment lasted 30 minutes or more, depending on the type of treatment you had.

Before your treatment started, you were given medicine to block pain.

Your doctor placed an ultrasound probe into your rectum. You probably also had a Foley catheter (tube) in your bladder to drain urine. Your doctor used CT scans or ultrasound to see the surgical area, and then used needles or special applicators to place the metal pellets into your prostate. They were put in place through your perineum (the area between the scrotum and the anus). The pellets deliver the radiation into your prostate.

What to Expect at Home

You may need to use a urinary catheter for 1 or 2 days if you have blood in your urine. Your doctor or nurse will show you how to use it. You may also feel the urge to urinate more often. Your perineum may be tender and bruised. Ice and pain medicine will help relieve your discomfort.

If you have a permanent implant, your doctor may tell you to limit the amount of time you spend around children and women who are pregnant for a while.

Activity

Take it easy when you return home. Mix light activity with periods of rest to help speed your recovery.

Avoid strenuous activity (such as housework, yard work, and lifting children) for at least 1 week. You should be able to return to your normal, light activities after that. You can resume sexual activity when you feel comfortable.

If you have a permanent implant, ask your doctor if you need to limit your activities. You will probably need to avoid sexual activity for about 2 weeks, and then use a condom for several weeks after that.

Self-care

Apply ice packs to the area for 20 minutes at a time to reduce pain and swelling. Do not put the ice directly on your skin. Wrap it in a cloth or towel.

Take your pain medicine as your doctor told you to.

You may resume a normal, healthy diet when you get home. Drink 8 to 10 glasses of water or unsweetened juice a day. Avoid alcohol for the first week.

You may shower and gently wash the perineum with a washcloth. Pat dry the tender areas. Do not soak in a bath tub, hot tub, or go swimming for 1 week.

Follow-up

You may need to follow up with your doctor for more treatment or imaging tests.

When to Call the Doctor

Call your doctor or nurse if you have:

  • Fever greater than 101°F and chills
  • Severe pain in your rectum when you urinate or at other times
  • Blood or blood clots in your urine
  • Bleeding from your rectum
  • Problems having a bowel movement or passing urine
  • Shortness of breath
  • Severe discomfort in the treatment area that is not relieved by pain medicine
  • Drainage from the place the catheter was inserted
  • Chest pain
  • Abdominal (belly) discomfort
  • Severe nausea or vomiting
  • Any new or unusual symptoms

References

D'Amico AV, Crook J, Beard CJ, DeWeese TL, Hurwitz M, Kaplan I. Radiation therapy for prostate cancer. In: Wein AJ, ed. Campbell-Walsh Urology. 9th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2007:chap 100.

Nelson WG, Carter HB. DeWeese TL, Eisenberger MA. Prostate cancer. In: Abeloff MD, Armitage JO, Niederhuber JE, Kastan MB, McKena WG, eds. Clinical Oncology. 4th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; 2008:chap 88.



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    Review Date: 1/21/2011

    Review By: Louis S. Liou, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor of Urology, Department of Surgery, Boston University School of Medicine. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

    The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- 2010 A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.

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