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Our Health Information Database is provided by A.D.A.M. the leading provider of electronic and printed information for professionals and consumers in healthcare and industry. It provides authoritative, reliable content written and reviewed by an editorial board who represent a variety of specialty areas. This board reviews and evaluates all healthcare information to ensure it is accurate, reliable, and can be used with complete confidence. And now you have access to the same authoritative, trusted clinical information relied upon by health professionals around the world.
Ureterocele

Definition

A ureterocele is a swelling at the bottom of one of the tubes (ureters) that carry urine from the kidney to the bladder. The swollen area can block urine flow.

A ureterocele is a birth defect.

Alternative Names

Causes, incidence, and risk factors

A ureterocele occurs in the lower part of the ureter, where the tube enters the bladder. The swollen area prevents urine from moving freely into the bladder. The urine collects in the ureter and stretches its walls, blowing it up like a water balloon.

A ureterocele can also cause urine to flow backward from the bladder to the kidney. This is called reflux.

Ureteroceles occur in about 1 in 500 to 1 in 4,000 people. Caucasians are most likely to be affected. Ureteroceles are equally common in left- and right-side ureters.

Symptoms

Signs and tests

Large ureteroceles are usually diagnosed earlier than smaller ones. A ureterocele may be discovered before the baby is born (during a pregnancy ultrasound).

Some people with ureteroceles do not know they have the condition. Often, the diagnosis is made later in life due to kidney stones or infection.

A urinalysis may reveal blood in the urine or signs of urinary tract infection.

The following tests may be performed:

Blood pressure may be high if there is kidney damage.

Treatment

Antibiotics are usually given to prevent further infections until surgery can be done.

The goal of treatment is to get rid of the blockage. Drains placed in the ureter or renal area (stents) may provide short-term relief of symptoms.

Surgery to repair the ureterocele usually cures the condition. Surgery involves making a cut into the ureterocele or removing the ureterocele and reattaching the ureter to the bladder. Which surgery is performed depends on the severity of the blockage.

Support Groups

Expectations (prognosis)

The outcome varies. If the obstruction can be cured, the damage may be temporary. However, damage to the kidney may be permanent, especially if the condition doesn't go away.

Kidney failure is uncommon because the other kidney usually continues to work as normal.

Complications

  • Permanent bladder damage (incontinence/urinary retention)
  • Permanent kidney damage, with a decrease or loss of function (one kidney)
  • Urinary tract infection that keeps coming back

Calling your health care provider

Call your health care provider if you have symptoms of ureterocele.

Prevention

References

Schlussel RN, Retik AB. Ectopic ureter, ureterocele, and other anomalies of the ureter. In: Wein AJ, ed. Campbell-Walsh Urology. 9th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2007:chap 116.

Guay-Woodford LM. Hereditary nephropathies and abnormalities of the urinary tract. In: Goldman L, Ausiello D, eds. Cecil Medicine. 23rd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2007:chap 129.

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    Review Date: 9/3/2010

    Review By: David C. Dugdale, III, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine; Scott Miller, MD, Urologist in private practice in Atlanta, Georgia. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

    The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- 2010 A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.

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