Mercy Hospital & Health Services Contact Us
MyChart
About Mercy
Join Our Team
set font size large set font size medium set font size small
email this page print this page
Health Illustrated Encyclopedia Banner
Health Illustrated Encyclopedia

Disclaimer:
Our Health Information Database is provided by A.D.A.M. the leading provider of electronic and printed information for professionals and consumers in healthcare and industry. It provides authoritative, reliable content written and reviewed by an editorial board who represent a variety of specialty areas. This board reviews and evaluates all healthcare information to ensure it is accurate, reliable, and can be used with complete confidence. And now you have access to the same authoritative, trusted clinical information relied upon by health professionals around the world.
Friedreich's ataxia

Definition

Friedreich's ataxia is a rare disease passed down through families (inherited) that affects the muscles and heart.

Alternative Names

Spinocerebellar degeneration

Causes, incidence, and risk factors

Friedreich's ataxia is caused by a defect in a gene called Frataxin (FXN), which is located on chromosome 9. Changes in this gene cause the body to produce too much of part of DNA called trinucleotide repeat (GAA). Normally, the body contains about 8 to 30 copies of GAA. Those with Individuals with Friedreich's ataxia have as many as 1,000 copies. The more copies of GAA a patient has, the earlier in life the disease starts and the faster it gets worse.

Friedreich's ataxia is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder. This means you must get a copy of the defective gene from both your mother and father.

About 1 in every 22,000-29,000 develop this disease. Family history of the condition raises your risk.

Symptoms

Symptoms are caused by the wearing away of structures in areas of the brain and spinal cord that control coordination, muscle movement, and some sensory functions. Symptoms generally begin in childhood before puberty, and may include:

Muscle problems lead to changes in the spine, which may result in scoliosis or kyphoscoliosis.

Heart disease usually develops and may lead to heart failure. Death may result from heart failure or dysrhythmias that do not respond to treatment. Diabetes may develop in later stages of the disease.

Signs and tests

The following tests may be performed:

Tests of the heart may show a condition called hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in about 66% of persons with this condition.

Blood sugar (glucose) tests may reveal diabetes or glucose intolerance. An eye exam may show damage to the optic nerve, which usually occurs without symptoms.

Treatment

Treatment for Friedreich's ataxia includes:

  • Counseling
  • Speech therapy
  • Physical therapy
  • Walking aids or wheelchairs

Orthopedic interventions (such as braces) may be needed for scoliosis and foot problems. Treatment of heart disease and diabetes may help improve the quality and duration of life.

Support Groups

Expectations (prognosis)

Friedreich's ataxia slowly gets worse and causes problems performing everyday activities. Most patients need to use a wheelchair within 15 years of the disease's start. The disease may lead to early death.

Complications

  • Diabetes
  • Heart failure or heart disease
  • Loss of ability to move around

Calling your health care provider

Call your health care provider if muscle weakness, numbness, loss of coordination, loss of reflexes, or other symptoms of Friedreich's ataxia occur (particularly if there is a family history of the disorder).

Prevention

Individuals with a family history of Friedreich's ataxia who intend to have children should consider genetic screening and counseling to determine their risk.

References

Johnston MV. Movement disorders. In: Kliegman RM, Behrman RE, Jenson HB, Stanton BF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 18th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2007:chap 597.

View Spanish Version

Encyclopedia Home
Drug Note Home
Health Information Home

Images

Care Points
    Read More

    Review Date: 11/22/2010

    Review By: Kevin Sheth, MD, Department of Neurology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

    The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- 2010 A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.

    www.adam.com
    www.mercyweb.org
    follow us online
    facebook youtube


    Contact us
    Home  |  Sitemap

    Disclaimer & Terms of Use  |  Privacy Statement  |  Notice of Privacy Practices
    Copyright ©2013 Mercy. Last modified 2/16/2011