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Special Considerations


This article may contain information on medical procedures that are not recommended or endorsed by Catholic Health Partners. Promotion of this topic is prohibited by the Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Services. In the Ethical and Religious Directives, Catholic health institutions are prohibited from condoning contraceptive practices. Married couples should be given information about natural family planning as well as the church’s teachings on responsible parenthood. The information in this article is designed for educational purposes only. It is not provided as a professional service or as medical advice for specific patients.

Hiccups

Definition

A hiccup is an unintentional movement (spasm) of the diaphragm, the muscle at the base of the lungs. The spasm is followed by quick closing of the vocal cords, which produces a distinctive sound.

Alternative Names

Singultus

Considerations

Hiccups often start for no apparent reason and usually disappear after a few minutes. Rarely, hiccups can last for days, weeks, or months. Hiccups are common and normal in newborns and infants.

Common Causes

  • Abdominal surgery
  • Any disease or disorder that irritates the nerves that control the diaphragm (such as pleurisy or pneumonia)
  • Hot and spicy foods or liquids
  • Noxious fumes
  • Stroke or tumor affecting the "hiccup center" in the brain

There may be no obvious cause for hiccups.

Home Care

There is no sure way to stop hiccups, but there are a number of common suggestions that may be effective:

  • Breathe repeatedly into a paper bag.
  • Drink a glass of cold water.
  • Eat a teaspoon of sugar.
  • Hold your breath.

Call your health care provider if

Contact your health care provider if hiccups persist for more than a few days.

What to expect at your health care provider's office

If hiccups persist to the point that you visit your health care provider, a medical history will be taken and a physical examination will be performed.

Medical history questions may include the following:

  • Do you get hiccups easily?
  • How long has this episode of hiccups lasted?
  • Have you recently eaten something that was hot or spicy?
  • Have you recently drank carbonated beverages?
  • Have you been exposed to any fumes?
  • What have you done to try to relieve the hiccups?
  • What has been effective for you in the past?
  • How effective was the attempt at home treatment?
  • Did the hiccups stop for a while and then restart?
  • What other symptoms are present?

Diagnostic tests are rarely necessary unless a disease or disorder is suspected as the cause.

To treat persistent hiccups, the health care provider may perform gastric lavage or massage of the carotid sinus in the neck. THIS MUST BE DONE BY THE HEALTH CARE PROVIDER. DO NOT ATTEMPT CAROTID MASSAGE AT HOME!

If hiccups continue, medications such as phenothiazine (especially chlorpromazine), baclofen, or anticonvulsants may help. Tube insertion (nasogastric intubation) may also provide relief.

Very rarely, medical methods fail to treat persistent hiccups. Further treatment may include a phrenic nerve block. The phrenic nerve controls the diaphragm.

References

Pollack MJ. Hiccups. In: Rakel P, Bope ET, eds. Conn's Current Therapy 2008. 60th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier;2008:chap 4.
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      Review Date: 2/22/2009

      Review By: Linda Vorvick, MD, Family Physician, Seattle Site Coordinator, Lecturer, Pathophysiology, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

      The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- 2010 A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.

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