Mercy Hospital & Health Services Contact Us
MyChart
About Mercy
Join Our Team
set font size large set font size medium set font size small
email this page print this page
Health Illustrated Encyclopedia Banner
Health Illustrated Encyclopedia

Disclaimer:
Our Health Information Database is provided by A.D.A.M. the leading provider of electronic and printed information for professionals and consumers in healthcare and industry. It provides authoritative, reliable content written and reviewed by an editorial board who represent a variety of specialty areas. This board reviews and evaluates all healthcare information to ensure it is accurate, reliable, and can be used with complete confidence. And now you have access to the same authoritative, trusted clinical information relied upon by health professionals around the world.

Special Considerations


This article may contain information on medical procedures that are not recommended or endorsed by Catholic Health Partners. Promotion of this topic is prohibited by the Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Services. In the Ethical and Religious Directives, Catholic health institutions are prohibited from condoning contraceptive practices. Married couples should be given information about natural family planning as well as the church’s teachings on responsible parenthood. The information in this article is designed for educational purposes only. It is not provided as a professional service or as medical advice for specific patients.

Calcium - urine

Definition

This test measures the amount of calcium in urine. All cells need calcium in order to work. Calcium helps build strong bones and teeth. It is important for heart function, and helps with muscle contraction, nerve signaling, and blood clotting.

See also: Calcium - blood

Alternative Names

Urinary Ca+2

How the test is performed

A 24-hour urine sample is generally needed:

  • On day 1, urinate into the toilet upon arising in the morning.
  • Collect all subsequent urine (in a special container) for the next 24-hours.
  • On day 2, urinate into the container in the morning upon arising.
  • Cap the container. Keep it in the refrigerator or a cool place during the collection period. Label the container with your name, the date, the time of completion, and return it as instructed.

A urine collection bag is needed for infants. This is a plastic bag with an adhesive paper on one end. Wash the area around the child's urethra. For boys, place the entire penis in the bag and attach the adhesive to nearby skin. For girls, place the bag over the labia and secure into place with the adhesive. You can place a diaper over the bag.

This procedure may take a couple of attempts -- lively infants can displace the bag. The infant should be checked frequently. Change the bag after the infant has urinated into it. Drain the urine into the container provided by your health care provider and deliver it to the laboratory or doctor's office as soon as possible.

How to prepare for the test

Your doctor may tell you to temporarily stop taking any drugs that may affect the test results.

Drugs that may increase urine calcium measurements include antacids, anticonvulsants, carbonic anhydrase inhibitor diuretics, and loop diuretics.

Drugs that may decrease urine calcium measurements include adrenocorticosteroids, birth control pills, and thiazide diuretics.

NEVER stop taking any medicine without first talking to your doctor.

If the 24-urine collection is being taken from an infant, a couple of extra collection bags may be necessary.

How the test will feel

The test involves only normal urination, and there is no discomfort.

Why the test is performed

This test is used to diagnose or monitor diseases of the parathyroid gland or kidneys, which can cause a calcium control disorder. If there is not enough calcium in your body fluids, it can lead to hyperexcited nerves and muscles. Too much calcium has the opposite effect.

The most common type of kidney stone contains calcium. This test may be used to diagnose such stones.

Normal Values

If a person is eating a normal diet, the expected amount of calcium in the urine is 100 to 300 mg/day. If eating a diet low in calcium, the amount of calcium in the urine will be 50 to 150 mg/day.

Note: mg/day = milligrams per day

What abnormal results mean

High levels of urine calcium may be due to:

Low levels of urine calcium may be due to:

What the risks are

There are no risks.

Special considerations

References

Wysolmerski JJ, Insogna KL. The parathyroid glands, hypercalcemia, and hypocalcemia. In: Goldman L, Ausiello D, eds. Cecil Medicine. 23rd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2007:chap 266.

View Spanish Version

Encyclopedia Home
Drug Note Home
Health Information Home

Images

Care Points
    Read More

    Review Date: 5/7/2009

    Review By: David C. Dugdale, III, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

    The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- 2010 A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.

    www.adam.com
    www.mercyweb.org
    follow us online
    facebook youtube


    Contact us
    Home  |  Sitemap

    Disclaimer & Terms of Use  |  Privacy Statement  |  Notice of Privacy Practices
    Copyright ©2013 Mercy. Last modified 2/16/2011