Mercy Hospital & Health Services Contact Us
MyChart
About Mercy
Join Our Team
set font size large set font size medium set font size small
email this page print this page
Health Illustrated Encyclopedia Banner
Health Illustrated Encyclopedia

Disclaimer:
Our Health Information Database is provided by A.D.A.M. the leading provider of electronic and printed information for professionals and consumers in healthcare and industry. It provides authoritative, reliable content written and reviewed by an editorial board who represent a variety of specialty areas. This board reviews and evaluates all healthcare information to ensure it is accurate, reliable, and can be used with complete confidence. And now you have access to the same authoritative, trusted clinical information relied upon by health professionals around the world.

Special Considerations


This article may contain information on medical procedures that are not recommended or endorsed by Catholic Health Partners. Promotion of this topic is prohibited by the Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Services. In the Ethical and Religious Directives, Catholic health institutions are prohibited from condoning contraceptive practices. Married couples should be given information about natural family planning as well as the church’s teachings on responsible parenthood. The information in this article is designed for educational purposes only. It is not provided as a professional service or as medical advice for specific patients.

Semen analysis

Definition

Semen analysis is a test to measure the amount and quality of a man's semen and sperm. Semen is the thick, white, sperm-containing fluid released during ejaculation.

The test is sometimes called a sperm count.

Alternative Names

Male fertility test; Sperm count

How the test is performed

You will need to provide a semen sample. Your health care provider will explain how to collect a sample.

Sperm release pathway
Sperm release pathway

Sample collection may involve masturbation and collecting the sperm into a sterile container. It may also be collected during intercourse by using a special condom supplied by your health care provider.

A laboratory specialist must look at the sample within 2 hours of the collection. The earlier the sample is analyzed, the more reliable the results. The laboratory specialist will look at the sample to determine the following details:

  • Fluid coagulation (thickening into a solid) and liquefaction
  • Fluid thickness, acidity, and sugar content
  • Resistance to flow (viscosity)
  • Sperm movement or motility
  • Number and structure of the sperm
  • Volume of semen

How to prepare for the test

Do not have any sexual activity that causes ejaculation for 2 - 3 days before the test.

How the test will feel

If you are uncomfortable about how the sample is to be taken, discuss it with your health care provider.

Why the test is performed

Semen analysis is one of the first tests done to evaluate a man's fertility. It can help determine if a problem in sperm production or quality of the sperm is causing infertility. Approximately half of couples unable to have children have a male infertility problem.

The test may also be used after a vasectomy to make sure there are no sperm in the semen. This can confirm the success of the vasectomy.

The test may also be performed for the following condition:

Normal Values

A few of the common normal values are listed below.

  • The normal volume varies from 1.5 to 5.0 milliliter per ejaculation.
  • The sperm count varies from 20 to 150 million sperm per milliliter.
  • At least 60% of the sperm should have a normal shape and show normal forward movement (motility).

However, how to interpret these values and other results from a semen analysis is not completely certain.

Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk to your doctor about the meaning of your specific test results.

What abnormal results mean

Abnormal results may suggest a male infertility problem. For example, if the sperm count is very low or very high, there is a likelihood of being less fertile. The acidity of the semen and the presence of white blood cells (suggesting infection) may influence fertility. Testing may reveal abnormal shapes or abnormal movements of the sperm.

However, there are many unknowns in male infertility. The results from the test may fail to explain the cause. If a low sperm count or abnormal semen is found, further testing may be required.

Many of these abnormalities are reversible or treatable.

What the risks are

There are no risks.

Special considerations

The use of the following may affect a man's fertility:

  • Alcohol
  • Many recreational and prescription drugs
  • Tobacco

References

View Spanish Version

Encyclopedia Home
Drug Note Home
Health Information Home

Images

Care Points
    Read More

    Review Date: 3/22/2010

    Review By: David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc., and Scott Miller, MD, Urologist in private practice in Atlanta, Georgia.

    The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- 2010 A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.

    www.adam.com
    www.mercyweb.org
    follow us online
    facebook youtube


    Contact us
    Home  |  Sitemap

    Disclaimer & Terms of Use  |  Privacy Statement  |  Notice of Privacy Practices
    Copyright ©2013 Mercy. Last modified 2/16/2011