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Herpes viral culture of lesion

Definition

Herpes viral culture of a lesion is a laboratory test to check if a skin sample is infected with the herpes simplex virus.

See also:

Alternative Names

Culture - herpes simplex virus; Herpes simplex virus culture

How the test is performed

A sample from a skin lesion (often a genital sore) or blister is needed. The health care provider will collect the sample during an active outbreak and place it in a laboratory container. The sample must include cells, not just fluid from the blister, because the virus is in the skin cells of the blister or ulcer.

At the laboratory, the sample is placed in a special dish and watched for the growth of the herpes simplex virus, or substances related to the virus. Special tests may also be done to determine whether it is herpex simplex virus type 1 or 2.

Results are available within 16 hours to 7 days (usually 2-4 days), depending on the laboratory method used.

How to prepare for the test

The sample must be collected during the worst part of an outbreak. This is considered the acute phase of infection.

How the test will feel

When the sample is collected, you may feel an uncomfortable scraping or sticky sensation. Sometimes a sample from the throat or eyes is needed. This involves rubbing a sterile swab against the eye or in the throat.

Why the test is performed

The test is done to confirm herpes simplex infection. The diagnosis is often made by physical examination (the health care provider looking at the sores), and the cultures and other tests are used to confirm that diagnosis.

Normal Values

A normal (negative) result means that the herpes simplex virus did not grow in the laboratory dish and the skin sample used in the test did not contain any herpes virus.

Unfortunately, a normal (negative) culture does not guarantee that you do not have a herpes infection or have not had one in the past.

What abnormal results mean

An abnormal (positive) result may mean that you have an active infection with herpes simplex virus. Herpes infections include herpes genitalis, which is genital herpes, or cold sores on the lips or in the mouth.

If the culture is positive for herpes, you may have recently become infected or you may have become infected in the past and are currently having an outbreak.

What the risks are

Risks include slight bleeding or infection in the area where the skin sample was removed.

Special considerations

The viral culture for herpes test is most likely to be accurate when a person is newly infected (during the first outbreak).

References

Gupta R, Warren T, Wald A. Genital herpes. Lancet. 2007; 370(9605):2127-37.

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    Review Date: 9/13/2009

    Review By: Susan Storck, MD, FACOG, Chief, Eastside Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Group Health Cooperative of Puget Sound, Redmond, WA; Clinical Teaching Faculty, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

    The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- 2010 A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.

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