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Our Health Information Database is provided by A.D.A.M. the leading provider of electronic and printed information for professionals and consumers in healthcare and industry. It provides authoritative, reliable content written and reviewed by an editorial board who represent a variety of specialty areas. This board reviews and evaluates all healthcare information to ensure it is accurate, reliable, and can be used with complete confidence. And now you have access to the same authoritative, trusted clinical information relied upon by health professionals around the world.

Special Considerations


This article may contain information on medical procedures that are not recommended or endorsed by Catholic Health Partners. Promotion of this topic is prohibited by the Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Services. In the Ethical and Religious Directives, Catholic health institutions are prohibited from condoning contraceptive practices. Married couples should be given information about natural family planning as well as the church’s teachings on responsible parenthood. The information in this article is designed for educational purposes only. It is not provided as a professional service or as medical advice for specific patients.

Pregnanediol

Definition

Pregnanediol is an inactive product that forms when the body breaks down the hormone progesterone. A test can be done to measure the amount of pregnanediol in urine. The urine test offers an indirect way to measure progesterone levels in the body.

Alternative Names

How the test is performed

A 24-hour urine sample is needed.

How to prepare for the test

Your doctor may tell you to stop taking certain drugs that can affect the test. For example, ACTH may increase test measurements. Birth control pills or progesterone may decrease test measurements.

How the test will feel

The test involves only normal urination, and there is no discomfort.

Why the test is performed

Before progesterone blood tests were available, this test was used to monitor pregnancies and check for possible problems with the ovaries or adrenal cortex.

In women, progesterone is produced mainly after the ovaries release an egg (ovulation). The main function of progesterone is to help the uterus prepare for possible implantation of a fertilized egg. After fertilization, progesterone is necessary for the development of the placenta, the organ that develops to nourish the growing baby. During pregnancy, most progesterone is produced by the placenta.

Some progesterone is also produced by the adrenal cortex. See: Adrenal glands

Currently there is little use for this test except in home ovulation predictor kits.

Normal Values

Normal values in women vary depending on when the test is done. Levels rise consistently during pregnancy and range from 40 milligrams to 100 milligrams in 24 hours.

Lower levels are found during certain phases of the menstrual cycle and after menopause.

In men, normal values range from 0.1 to 0.7 milligrams per 24 hours.

What abnormal results mean

Higher-than-normal levels may be due to:

Lower-than-normal levels may be due to:

What the risks are

There are no risks.

Special considerations

References

Lobo RA. Reproductive endocrinology: neuroendocrinology, gonadotropins, sex steroids, prostaglandins, ovulation, menstruation, hormone assay. In: Katz VL, Lentz GM, Lobo RA, Gershenson DM, eds. Comprehensive Gynecology. 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Mosby Elsevier; 2007:chap 4.

Lehmann HP, Henry JB. SI units. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods. 21st ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2006:appendix 5.

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    Review Date: 4/12/2009

    Review By: Linda Vorvick, MD, Family Physician, Seattle Site Coordinator, Lecturer, Pathophysiology, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, University of Washington School of Medicine; and Susan Storck, MD, FACOG, Chief, Eastside Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Group Health Cooperative of Puget Sound, Redmond, Washington; Clinical Teaching Faculty, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

    The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- 2010 A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.

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