Mercy Hospital & Health Services Contact Us
MyChart
About Mercy
Join Our Team
set font size large set font size medium set font size small
email this page print this page
Health Illustrated Encyclopedia Banner
Health Illustrated Encyclopedia

Disclaimer:
Our Health Information Database is provided by A.D.A.M. the leading provider of electronic and printed information for professionals and consumers in healthcare and industry. It provides authoritative, reliable content written and reviewed by an editorial board who represent a variety of specialty areas. This board reviews and evaluates all healthcare information to ensure it is accurate, reliable, and can be used with complete confidence. And now you have access to the same authoritative, trusted clinical information relied upon by health professionals around the world.

Special Considerations


This article may contain information on medical procedures that are not recommended or endorsed by Catholic Health Partners. Promotion of this topic is prohibited by the Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Services. In the Ethical and Religious Directives, Catholic health institutions are prohibited from condoning contraceptive practices. Married couples should be given information about natural family planning as well as the church’s teachings on responsible parenthood. The information in this article is designed for educational purposes only. It is not provided as a professional service or as medical advice for specific patients.

LH urine test (home test)

Definition

An LH urine test detects a rise in lutenizing hormone (LH). Such a rise, or surge, signals the ovary to release the egg. This at-home test is often used by women to help predict ovulation.

Alternative Names

Luteinizing hormone urine test (home test); Ovulation prediction test; Urinary LH immunoassays; At-home ovulation prediction test

How the test is performed

Ovulation prediction test kits usually come with five to seven sticks. You may need to test for several days to detect a surge in LH. The specific time of month that you start testing depends on the length of your menstrual cycle. For example, if your normal menstrual cycle is 28 days, you'll need to test on day 11 -- that is, the 11th day after you started your period.

You will need to urinate on the test stick, or place the stick into urine that has been collected into a sterile container. The test stick will turn a certain color or display a positive sign if a surge is detected. A positive result means you should ovulate in the next 24 to 36 hours, but this may not be the case for all women. The kit's instruction booklet will tell you how to properly read the results.

If you miss a day, you may miss your surge. You may also miss recording a surge if you have an irregular menstrual cycle.

How to prepare for the test

Do not drink large amounts of fluids before using the test.

Ask your doctor if you need to stop taking certain drugs before using this test.

Drugs that can decrease LH measurements include estrogens, progesterone and testosterone. Estrogens and progesterone may be found in birth control pills and hormone replacement therapy.

The drug clomiphene citrate (Clomid) can increase LH levels. This drug is used to help trigger ovulation. Women taking this drug should wait three days after stopping the medicine before checking their LH levels.

How the test will feel

The test involves normal urination. There is no pain or discomfort.

Why the test is performed

The test is most often done to determine when a women will ovulate. It may also be used to determine if you need to adjust doses of certain medications.

Normal Values

A positive result indicates an "LH surge" and is a sign that ovulation may soon occur. Read your specific manufacturer's instruction booklet for complete details.

What abnormal results mean

What the risks are

Rare false positive results can occur. This means the test kit may falsely predict ovulation.

Special considerations

If you are unable to detect a surge or do not become pregnant after using an ovulation prediction kit for several months, contact your doctor. You may need to see an infertility specialist.

LH urine tests are not the same as at home fertility monitors. Fertility monitors are digital handheld devices that predict ovulation based on electrolyte levels in saliva, LH levels in urine, or your basal body temperature. These devices can store ovulation information for several menstrual cycles.

References

Lobo RA. Infertility: Etiology, diagnostic evaluation, management, prognosis. In: Katz VL, Lentz GM, Lobo RA, Gershenson DM, eds. Comprehensive Gynecology. 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Mosby Elsevier; 2007:chap 41.

Jose-Miller AB. Infertility. Am Fam Physician. 15 Mar 2007; 75(6): 849-56.

Speroff L, Fritz MA. Female infertility. In: Speroff L, Fritz MA, eds. Clinical Gynecologic Endocrinology and Infertility. 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins; 2005:chap 27.

View Spanish Version

Encyclopedia Home
Drug Note Home
Health Information Home

Images

Care Points
    Read More

      Review Date: 5/15/2009

      Review By: Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Medical Director, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, University of Washington, School of Medicine; and Susan Storck, MD, FACOG, Chief, Eastside Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Group Health Cooperative of Puget Sound, Redmond, Washington; Clinical Teaching Faculty, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

      The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- 2010 A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.

      www.adam.com
      www.mercyweb.org
      follow us online
      facebook youtube


      Contact us
      Home  |  Sitemap

      Disclaimer & Terms of Use  |  Privacy Statement  |  Notice of Privacy Practices
      Copyright ©2013 Mercy. Last modified 2/16/2011